in

The 50 Best Computer-Mediated Communication Articles

Computers play a larger and larger part of our professional lives as the days go by. It goes without saying then that they play an important part in how we communicate with each other. The following list is a collection of the 50 best articles on computer-mediated communication.

#1 Deaf and Hard of Hearing Smartphone Users: Intersectionality and the Penetration of Ableist Communication Norms

This article shows how smartphone usage among deaf and hard of hearing (HoH) people is shaped by “normative” communication values, and how smartphones, despite seeming accessible, can reproduce hegemonic communicative norms. Qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews conducted in Israel shows that social norms of voice calls impact other smartphone interactions, such that people who cannot perform voice calls are required to obey vocal norms of immediacy even while interacting accessibly through text-based instant messaging (IM) apps or video calls. Drawing on critical disability studies, we show how deaf and HoH smartphone users’ communicative practices vary according to the intersections of their audiological status with other stigmatized positions, which has profound implications for our understanding of media accessibility.

submitted by

11 points
Upvote Downvote

#2 Is That My Friend or an Advert? The Effectiveness of Instagram Native Advertisements Posing as Social Posts

Advertisers have turned attention to the popular photograph-based social network Instagram. One technique for reaching consumers has been advertisements resembling posts one’s friends might make. These native advertisements use Instagram’s conventions and may be unrecognized as sponsored messages at first glance, when browsing one’s Instagram. A within-subjects experiment (N = 482) tested these native ads against both user-generated posts and traditional advertisements. These message types were presented in a repeated-measures design, rotated across three well-known brands, and interspersed with distractor posts. Results indicated that the three message types produced similar effects on ad attitude, brand attitude, and behavioral intention. However, user-generated social posts produced more credibility and social comparison than native ads, and native ads produced more credibility and social comparison than advertisements. This yielded indirect effects on dependent variables of interest, despite the lack of total effects. Sponsorship recognition was relatively high for native ads but did not mediate effects.

submitted by

#3 Motivations, Usage, and Perceived Social Networks Within and Beyond Social Media

This study addresses the questions of how individuals use social media (SM) to build awareness of social networks (network perceptions) within and beyond SM, and how motivations and SM behaviors differentiate individuals’ ability to build such awareness. The analysis of the 2017 Taiwan Communication Survey (TCS) identifies three types of users based on their motivations for SM use: omnivores, time-killers, and social-groomers, who are differentiated from one another in terms of different types of SM behaviors as well as perceived network structures on SM and beyond. For example, omnivores, who use SM for diverse purposes, tend to engage in SM browsing and reacting more than time-killers, who use SM to pass time. Compared to time-killers, social-groomers, those who use SM for social purposes, are more likely to perceive that they have a larger SM response network, a response network containing close ties, and that they have maintained diverse social relationships in the form of mixed-media relationships (MMRs). Moreover, SM posting is associated with the size and the diverse composition of the perceived response network on SM. More frequent SM posting is also associated with perceptions of having diverse social contacts maintained through MMRs, but such association depends on the size and composition of the perceived SM response network.

submitted by

#4 Facebook and Face-to-Face: Examining the Short- and Long-Term Reciprocal Effects of Interactions, Perceived Social Support, and Depression among International Students

We investigated the proposition that among international students, face-to-face (FtF) interaction with the host-country network, and Facebook interaction with the host- and the home-country networks predict perceived social support, which, in turn, predicts psychological adjustment. We tested the model using cross-lagged and non-lagged reciprocal effects path analyses on three-wave panel data gathered via online surveys. The results indicated that whereas FtF interaction with the host-country increased perceived social support in the short-term, Facebook interaction with the host-country lowered perceived social support in the long-term. Perceived social support increased Facebook interaction with the host-country both in the short- and the long-term. At the same time, perceived social support, in the long-term, decreased depressive symptoms. In the short-term, perceived social support and depressive symptoms negatively reinforced each other. Our longitudinal study contributes to existing literature by elucidating the complex interplay of communication channels and their implications on international students’ experiences.

submitted by

#5 Strategic Social Grooming: Emergent Social Grooming Styles on Facebook, Social Capital and Well-Being

Social grooming behaviors on social media contribute to one’s social capital and well-being. This study considered common types of social interactions on social media and proposes a social grooming style framework developed through signaling theory. Unlike the previous research, which has examined a single type of social grooming behavior, this study examined many behaviors simultaneously to identify a social grooming style. With a nationally representative sample from Taiwan (N = 1,350), a latent class analysis (LCA) revealed five social grooming styles: image managers, social butterflies, trend followers, maintainers, and lurkers. Social grooming style is significantly associated with social capital and well-being. Image managers receive the most social benefits, whereas lurkers receive the fewest. Social butterflies have considerable bridging social capital and well-being but the least bonding social capital. The results suggest that the rich may get richer, but only if the engaged social grooming style is strategic.

submitted by

#6 Benefits of Browsing? The Prevalence, Nature, and Effects of Profile Consumption Behavior in Social Network Sites

This study examines the effects of profile browsing on social network sites (SNSs) on social capital via information propagation between users. We analyze data from a study of 42 million users of the Chinese equivalent of Facebook called Renren, with over 1.8 million profile browsing events collected unobtrusively from the network to understand the prevalence and nature of “passive” profile browsing versus more visible forms of social interaction. Results show that profile browsing is more frequent than visible interaction on the SNS and can be modeled on the basis of a user’s network size, account longevity, and production or reception of visible content. Drawing upon scholarship on social capital, we then evaluate the capacity of profile browsing to propagate information within the network and thus to affect bridging social capital. Our results challenge some commonly-held notions about profile consumption behavior on SNSs and its capacity to increase social capital.

submitted by

#7 What’s in a Smile? Politicizing Disability through Selfies and Affect

This article focuses on selfies and empowerment of individuals with physical disabilities. By exploring the #FSHDselfies campaign as a case study, I discuss the role affect plays in mediated advocacy for the representation of non-normative bodies, allowing disabled individuals to gather as a community and disrupt contemporary beauty standards. I draw on the case study to re-articulate the term “community of affect” (Climo, 2001) as the socio-political structure that promotes marginalized groups’ negotiation of collective identity and communal action geared towards cultural, social, and political change. This community can be seen as a sub-section or a specific discursive space categorized under “affective publics” (Papacharissi, 2014). I show in this context how participatory forms of representation open a space for negotiation and criticism of marginalized groups on the one hand, while oversimplifying the complex and diverse lives of minority groups on the other hand.

submitted by

#8 Platform-swinging in a poly-social-media context: How and why users navigate multiple social media platforms

Guided by the frameworks of niche and polymedia theories, this study sought to understand the phenomenon of platform-swinging on social media, which refers to the routine use of multiple social media platforms that has become commonplace across different ages. Based on focus group discussions (FGDs) with 62 social media users in Singapore, this study found that social media users engage in platform-swinging for relationship management and self-presentation gratifications. While these gratifications are also served by individual social media platforms, platform-swinging allows social media users to navigate structural, social, and norm barriers to obtain greater gratification opportunities. This has implications on how social media users subsequently regard and segment their personal relationships.

submitted by

#9 How do Online Comments Affect Perceived Descriptive Norms of E-Cigarette Use? The Role of Quasi-Statistical Sense, Valence Perceptions, and Exposure Dosage

By facilitating user participatory features such as online comments, digital media expand the means through which individuals can get access to others’ behavior choices. This opens new research avenues in the pursuit of understanding how social influence operates in the virtual space. The current study examined whether anonymous others’ behavior choices within the online comment board may affect viewers’ descriptive norm perceptions in the real world. Results show that, given sufficient total exposure, viewers’ “quasi-statistical sense” allowed them to correctly identify the numerical majority through subtle individual behavior cues embedded in the online comments, which effectively influenced their estimation of the actual e-cigarette use prevalence among the U.S. population. Perceived behavior choice dominance and valence stance dominance toward e-cigarette use on the online comment board were found to mediate the relationship. Implications for the underlying mechanism of descriptive norm perception formation and future directions are discussed.

submitted by

#10 Explaining the Emergence of Political Fragmentation on Social Media: The Role of Ideology and Extremism

This article is a systematic large-scale study of the reasons driving political fragmentation on social media. Making use of a comparative dataset of the Twitter discussion activities of 115 political groups in 26 countries, it shows that groups that are further apart in ideological terms interact less, and that groups that sit at the extremes of the ideological scale are particularly likely to have lower patterns of interaction. Indeed, exchanges between centrists who sit on different sides of the left–right divide are more likely than connections between centrists and extremists who are from the same ideological wing. In light of the results, theory about exposure to different ideological viewpoints online is enhanced.

submitted by

#11 Cracking the Tinder Code: An Experience Sampling Approach to the Dynamics and Impact of Platform Governing Algorithms

This article conceptualizes algorithmically-governed platforms as the outcomes of a structuration process involving three types of actors: platform owners/developers, platform users, and machine learning algorithms. This threefold conceptualization informs media effects research, which still struggles to incorporate algorithmic influence. It invokes insights into algorithmic governance from platform studies and (critical) studies in the political economy of online platforms. This approach illuminates platforms' underlying technological and economic logics, which allows to construct hypotheses on how they appropriate algorithmic mechanisms, and how these mechanisms function. The present study tests the feasibility of experience sampling to test such hypotheses. The proposed methodology is applied to the case of mobile dating app Tinder.

submitted by

#12 Reinforcement or Displacement? the Reciprocity of FTF, IM, and SNS Communication and Their Effects on Loneliness and Life Satisfaction

Does communication on social network sites (SNSs) or instant messengers (IMs) reinforce or displace face-to-face (FtF) communication, and how do the 3 channels affect loneliness and life satisfaction? Using cross-lagged structural equation modeling in a longitudinal and representative sample from Germany, we found that SNS communication increased both FtF and IM communication 6 months later. Likewise, IM communication at T1 increased SNS communication at T2. FtF, SNS, and IM communication did not affect loneliness, and FtF and IM communication did not change life satisfaction. However, communication on SNSs slightly increased life satisfaction. Thus, the data indicated that conversing via SNSs and IM has a mainly reinforcing effect and that communicating via SNSs can enhance life satisfaction several months later.

submitted by

#13 Digital Game Dynamics Preferences and Player Types

In this study, we examine digital game preferences by identifying game dynamics, i.e. player–game interaction modes, of 700 contemporary digital games, and players' (N = 1717) desire to play games with specific types of dynamics. Based on statistical analysis of the data, 5 game dynamics preference categories (“assault,” “manage,” “journey,” “care,” and “coordinate”) and 7 player types were revealed. The results show that identifying player types requires including both preferred and undesired game dynamics categories in the analysis. The findings unveil digital gaming as a more multifaceted phenomenon than common stereotypes suggest. The original game preferences model we present in this study can be conceptualized as a complementary approach for motivations to play and player behavior studies.

submitted by

#14 The Identification and Influence of Social Roles in a Social Media Product Community

This research focuses on the identification of social roles and an investigation of their influence in online context. Relying on a systemic approach for role conceptualization, we investigate member's activity, shared content and position in the network within a consumer to consumer social media-based community (SMC) around a product. This investigation led to the identification of ten core roles, based on three key elements: object of interest (product, practice, and community), main contribution type (sharing information and seeking information), individual orientation (factual, emotional). We propose an explanation about how these roles, through their positioning, participate in the community dynamics and how they contribute to the creation and diffusion of cookery as a social practice, shaping the periphery around this practice.

submitted by

#15 We Face, I Tweet: How Different Social Media Influence Political Participation through Collective and Internal Efficacy

This study advances a theoretical model centered on collective and internal efficacy to explain the separate pathways through which political sharing on Facebook and Twitter may influence individuals to engage in political activities. We test the model with data from a 2-wave panel survey conducted with an adult population in 2013 in Chile. We found that frequent usage of Facebook and Twitter for sharing political information is conducive to higher levels of participation through different efficacy measures. Facebook has a significant effect on collective—not internal—efficacy, whereas Twitter's effect is on internal—not collective—efficacy. Results are discussed in light of the diverse affordances and strengths of network ties of Facebook and Twitter.

submitted by

#16 The Relationship between Cyberbalkanization and Opinion Polarization: Time-Series Analysis on Facebook Pages and Opinion Polls during the Hong Kong Occupy Movement

Online activity is often cyberbalkanized, but it remains unclear whether this phenomenon leads to polarization of public opinion or if the relationship works in the reverse direction. This study tested the temporal association between cyberbalkanization and opinion polarization during the debate on political reform in Hong Kong. Online communities were constructed by a post-sharing network of 1,644 Facebook pages (101,410 shares); the differences between intra- and inter-community shares were derived, and a cyberbalkanization index was computed. A time-series analysis showed that the index temporally preceded the opinion polarization, i.e., most of the opinion poll's respondents gave extreme ratings to government leaders, but not vice versa. The index was particularly predictive of polarization among youth.

submitted by

#17 Civil Society in times of Crisis: Understanding Collective Action Dynamics in Digitally-Enabled Volunteer Networks

Social media play an important role in political mobilization. Voluntary engagement can especially benefit from new opportunities for organizing collective action. Although research has explored the use of Twitter by decentralized individuals for this, there has been little emphasis on its use for community engagement and the provision of public goods. Even less is known about its role in the emergence and offline expansion of spontaneous self-organized solidarity initiatives. This paper investigates how networked communication facilitates self-organization and the development of ties in a network of volunteers in Greece. To examine whether initiative-specific community feelings that can transcend online-offline divides evolve in such hybrid networks, the analysis is complemented with individual-level data drawn from a survey with the initiative's volunteers.

submitted by

#18 Digital News Consumption and Copyright Intervention: Evidence from Spain before and after the 2015 “Link Tax”

We analyze patterns of digital news consumption before and after a “link tax” was introduced in Spain. This new legislation imposed a copyright fee for showing snippets of content created by newspapers and resulted in the shutdown of Google News Spain. The Spanish copyright law is a precedent to the Copyright Directive currently submitted to the European Parliament, which is planning to impose a similar “link tax.” We offer empirical evidence that can help evaluate the impact of that sort of intervention. We analyze data tracking news consumption behavior to assess changes in audience reach and audience fragmentation. We show that the law has no discernible impact on reach, but we identify an increase in the fragmentation of news consumption.

submitted by

#19 The Antecedents of Community-Oriented Internet Use: Community Participation and Community Satisfaction

The linkage between the Internet and the offline community has been the subject of considerable research in the last decade. Scholars have been particularly interested in the effects of the Internet on offline community, and the relationship between Internet use and community participation. Based on the social shaping of technology and channel complementarity theories, this study proposes that community participation will be positively related to community-based Internet use. In addition, it posits that satisfaction with the community will emerge as a positive predictor of community-based Internet use. A regression analysis of data gathered by the Pew Center for the People and the Press demonstrates that community satisfaction and community participation explain variance in community-based Internet use beyond that explained by demographic variables.

submitted by

#20 Watching Me Watching You: How Observational Learning Affects Self-disclosure on Social Network Sites?

Many explanations have been proposed regarding people’s willingness to disclose information on social network sites (SNSs). Focusing on the reciprocal nature of such sites, this study explores the significant role observational learning (OL) plays in determining users’ willingness to self-disclose information on Facebook. It demonstrates how the ability to view other users’ actions—and the rewards and setbacks they encounter—impinge on their risk assessment and resulting disclosure behavior. Using an online survey of 742 Facebook users and an experiment conducted with 264 such participants, we demonstrated that users learn from others regarding self-disclosure behavior and resulting gains/losses. We showed that the observation mechanism contributes to reward envy, that leads to a high level of self-disclosure behavior. By contrast, observation of risks has only a marginal effect on such undertakings.

submitted by

#21 Unpacking Medium Effects on Social Psychological Processes in Computer-mediated Communication Using the Social Relations Model

This article introduces the social relations model (SRM) to unpack medium effects on social psychological processes. Although such effects have been theorized at group, dyadic, and individual levels separately, some of them can be concurrently analyzed as medium moderation on SRM components. Drawing on existing theories of computer-mediated communication (CMC), we map SRM components onto social psychological processes susceptible to medium effects: (a) “group mean” and “consensus” onto group social integration, (b) “uniqueness” and “dyadic reciprocity” onto relationship development, and (c) “assimilation” and relations between ingroup and outgroup SRM components onto social identity processes. We also summarize the SRM analytics and scenarios of medium moderation, and illustrate the key analytical procedures for adopting the SRM for CMC research.

submitted by

#22 Structure of Ego-Alter Relationships of Politicians in Twitter

We analyze the ego-alter Twitter networks of 300 Italian MPs and 18 European leaders, and of about 14,000 generic users. We find structural properties typical of social environments, meaning that Twitter activity is controlled by constraints that are similar to those shaping conventional social relationships. However, the evolution of ego-alter ties is very dynamic, which suggests that they are not entirely used for social interaction, but for public signaling and self-promotion. From this standpoint, the behavior of EU leaders is much more evident, while Italian MPs are in between them and generic users. We find that politicians – more than generic users – create relationships as a side effect of tweeting on discussion topics, rather than by contacting specific alters.

submitted by

#23 The Influence of the Avatar on Online Perceptions of Anthropomorphism, Androgyny, Credibility, Homophily, and Attraction

It has become increasingly common for Web sites and computer media to provide computer generated visual images, called avatars, to represent users and bots during online interactions. In this study, participants (N = 255) evaluated a series of avatars in a static context in terms of their androgyny, anthropomorphism, credibility, homophily, attraction, and the likelihood they would choose them during an interaction. The responses to the images were consistent with what would be predicted by uncertainty reduction theory. The results show that the masculinity or femininity (lack of androgyny) of an avatar, as well as anthropomorphism, significantly influence perceptions of avatars. Further, more anthropomorphic avatars were perceived to be more attractive and credible, and people were more likely to choose to be represented by them. Participants reported masculine avatars as less attractive than feminine avatars, and most people reported a preference for human avatars that matched their gender. Practical and theoretical implications of these results for users, designers, and researchers of avatars are discussed.

submitted by

#29 It Takes at Least Two to Tango: A Population-Level Perspective on Interrelated Patterns of Media Use

We introduce a population-level perspective on the longstanding debate on displacement versus complementarity by recognizing that an individual’s social interactions are dependent on emerging media use patterns in the wider population. Our longitudinal, cross-regional analyses at the population-level and individual-level indicate that two opposing forces coexist: individual Internet use and individual face-to-face (f2f) interaction are positively correlated, suggesting complementarity. However, local peers’ Internet use and individual f2f interactions are negatively related, suggesting displacement. Interestingly, when social networking site uptake is high, individual Internet non-use is associated with a more pronounced negative association between peers’ Internet use and individual-level f2f interactions. We discuss the implications of coexisting individual-level complementarity and population-level displacement for both users and non-users.

submitted by

#24 One Size Fits All: Context Collapse, Self-Presentation Strategies and Language Styles on Facebook

This study empirically examines context collapse on Facebook by examining audience influences on content and language in self-disclosures. Context collapse is the process of disparate audiences being conjoined into one. Using a public longitudinal behavioral data set of 6,378 Facebook users, the study found that the size and heterogeneity of people’s networks were positively associated with the number of text status updates they posted, but negatively associated with language style variability of these updates during 12 months. Results suggest that people manage their online self-presentation in ways that are consistent with lowest common denominator, imagined audience, and accommodation propositions. Network size was positively associated with the proportion of positive emotional language and negatively with negative emotional language, whereas heterogeneity had the opposite effect.

submitted by

#25 Cyberbullying Bystander Intervention: The Number of Offenders and Retweeting Predict Likelihood of Helping a Cyberbullying Victim

Cyberbullying happens while bystanders are watching. To understand cyberbystanders’ experience, the present experiment investigates how repetitive aspects of online communication influence bystanders’ perceptions and intentions to halt cyberbullying. We consider the role repetition plays in identifying cyberbullying, and outline two of its mechanisms—power imbalance and intention. Participants (N = 133) were exposed to messages on Twitter that either contained retweets or original offenses from one or several offenders. Although cyberbystanders were generally unwilling to intervene, seeing several offenders increased their likelihood of engaging in the Bystander Intervention Model’s (BIM) stages. Further, re-sharing moderated the effect of number of offenders suggesting cyberbystanders may be less willing to intervene when they read re-shared rather than original content. Implications for cyberbystander interventions are discussed.

submitted by

#26 Performing a Vanilla Self: Respectability Politics, Social Class, and the Digital World

“Respectability politics” describes a self-presentation strategy historically adopted by African-American women to reject White stereotypes by promoting morality while de-emphasizing sexuality. While civil rights activists and feminists criticize respectability politics as reactionary, subordinated groups frequently use these tactics to gain upward mobility. This paper analyzes how upwardly mobile young people of low socio-economic status in New York City manage impressions online by adhering to normative notions of respectability. Our participants described how they present themselves on social media by self-censoring, curating a neutral image, segmenting content by platform, and avoiding content and contacts coded as lower class. Peers who post sexual images, primarily women, were considered unrespectable and subject to sexual shaming. These strategies reinforce racist and sexist notions of appropriate behavior, simultaneously enabling and limiting participants’ ability to succeed. We extend the impression management literature to examine how digital media mediates the intersection of class, gender, and race.

submitted by

#27 The Associations Between Online Media Use and Users’ Perceived Social Resources: A Meta-Analysis

Conflicting findings have emerged from the large number of studies on the relationship of online media use (OMU) and users’ perceived social resources (PSR). In contrast to the numerous primary studies, a comprehensive meta-analysis on the relationship between the use of different online media and PSR has been lacking to date. The findings presented are based on 342 effect sizes from 63 studies and represent data from over 35,500 individuals. The results reveal a small and positive relationship between the two variables. Detailed analyses suggest that the use of different online media, as well as the measurement of OMU and PSR, might affect the relationships obtained. Implications and directions for theoretical development and empirical research are also discussed.

submitted by

#28 Interactivity in Online Chat: Conversational Contingency and Response Latency in Computer-mediated Communication

In dyadic online chats with customers, agents commonly employ scripted responses and converse with several customers simultaneously in order to enhance efficiency. These techniques, however, can affect dimensions of interactivity—conversational contingency and response latency—undermining interpersonal assessments, satisfaction, and organizations’ relationships with customers. This research incorporates aspects of interactivity to the social information processing (SIP) theory of computer-mediated communication, that addresses conversational behaviors that affect interpersonal relations in the absence of nonverbal cues. In a 2 × 2 between-subjects experiment, observers watched one of four versions of a dialogue between a customer and sales support agent, which differed with respect to the agent’s response latency and conversational contingency. Results confirmed deleterious effects of non-contingency on outcomes. Contingency moderated latency effects. Mediation analyses showed indirect effects of contingency via interpersonal judgments on organization/customer relations. Implications for a more comprehensive approach to SIP conclude the study.

submitted by

#30 News Attention in a Mobile Era

Mobile access to the Internet is changing the way people consume information, yet we know little about the effects of this shift on news consumption. Consuming news is key to democratic citizenship, but is attention to news the same in a mobile environment? We argue that attention to news on mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones is not the same as attention to news for those on computers. Our research uses eye tracking in two lab experiments to capture the effects of mobile device use on news attention. We also conduct a large-scale study of web traffic data to provide further evidence that news attention is significantly different across computers and mobile devices.

submitted by

#31 How Young Users Deal With Multiple Platforms: The Role of Meaning-Making in Social Media Repertoires

This paper draws upon 50 interviews and a survey (N = 700) to understand how young people in Argentina manage the proliferation of social media platforms in their everyday lives. Applying work on repertoires, niche theory, polymedia, and media ideologies, we explore how users’ practices are shaped by constellations of meaning attributed to each platform. We find that WhatsApp is a multifaceted communication domain; Facebook is a space for displaying the socially-acceptable self; Instagram is an environment for stylized self-presentation; Twitter is a venue for information and informality; and Snapchat is a place for spontaneous and ludic connections. These constellations are shaped socially and comparatively, and are relatively autonomous from technical affordances. We reflect on the relationship between users’ agency and the structures where it is enacted.

submitted by

#32 Longitudinal Change of an Online Political Discussion Forum: Antecedents of Discussion Network Size and Evolution

By analyzing 13-month longitudinal digital trace data, we examined why some people have larger discussion networks than others and which communication and relational characteristics contribute to the evolution of discussion network ties. Implementing a network analysis, we found that an online forum’s structural qualities tended to become stable over time. Discussants’ average network size was 4.6, and discussants retained one out of five members after more than one year. Those who had larger networks tended to participate in more conversations rather than staying longer or showing up more frequently. One’s reputation or potential political heterogeneity from the general consensus of the forum did not influence one’s network size. Reciprocity and popularity contributed to the maintenance or creation of discussion ties.

submitted by

#33 Talking Engagement Into Being: A Three-Wave Panel Study Linking Boundary Management Preferences, Work Communication on Social Media, and Employee Engagement

Widespread use of social media across work and non-work boundaries has heightened concerns about employee engagement in the contemporary workforce. This study examines how employees’ boundary management preferences influence their work communication on social media, and how these factors impact their engagement. Results from three waves of survey data (N = 361) demonstrate that work communication mediates the relationship between employee boundary preferences and engagement, supporting the hypothesized causal structure over alternative models. Overall, the findings contribute a novel perspective on employee engagement by showing that mediated work communication plays a central role in constructing engagement, rather than merely demonstrating it. We discuss how organizations can leverage this knowledge to address critical concerns about workplace (dis)engagement in the digital age.

submitted by

#34 Meme Templates as Expressive Repertoires in a Globalizing World: A Cross-Linguistic Study

This study uses meme templates as a lens for exploring cultural globalization. By conceptualizing such templates as expressive repertoires that simultaneously enable and limit expression, we examined global and local dimensions of mainstream meme culture. We traced the top 100 templates in meme generators in English, German, Spanish, and Chinese, using 10 examples to typify each (n = 4000). Combining quantitative and qualitative analysis, we examined the forms, social identities, and emotions embedded in these templates. Our findings demonstrated that whereas meme templates are dominated by American/Western pop culture, local templates are also evident, especially in Chinese. Overall, memes are socially conservative yet emotionally disruptive; while they align with hegemonic representation patterns, their emotional palette tilts toward the negative, with anger as a major anchor and happiness expressed ironically. Finally, our findings suggested an individualism–collectivism puzzle, wherein emotions in memes seem to contradict the existing literature on cultural values.

submitted by

#35 Can Burdensome Facebook “Friends” Cause You Pain? Self-Reported Pain as a Motivation for Exclusion

People need positive social connections, which Facebook can fulfill. However, some Facebook “friends” are poor social exchange partners due to inhibiting a Facebook user’s ability to socially connect online. Poor partners may be burdensome and a Facebook user may distance oneself from the burdensome person. We contend pain is a physical signal that motivates exclusionary behaviors towards burdensome others. We manipulated burden by having participants recall (Study 2) or, in Studies 1 and 3, read and think about a Facebook friend who was burdensome, neutral, or rewarding. When recalling or thinking about a burdensome, compared to rewarding or neutral, Facebook friend, participants self-reported more pain, increased negative affect, and indicated they would do more exclusionary Facebook behaviors. Moreover, physical and affective components of self-reported pain mediated the relation between burden and exclusionary behavior. Interactions on Facebook with poor exchange partners (i.e., burdensome) can cause both self-reported physical and psychological distress.

submitted by

#36 Standing Up for Sweden? The Racist Discourses, Architectures and Affordances of an Anti-Immigration Facebook Group

Facebook has faced growing criticism regarding its handling of hateful user-generated content (UGC) with research revealing how the platform can foster both covert and overt racism. This research has tended to focus on racist content while relying on abstract references to the general logics of social media platforms. In this article we consider how Facebook shapes the production of racist discourse in more concrete ways by integrating a concern for the platform’s architectures and affordances within a broader analysis of the immigration-related discussions of a large Swedish Facebook group. We combine a quantitative topic modeling of a large data set of the group’s UGC with a qualitative critical discourse analysis (CDA) of a sample of that data set. Our findings show how Facebook enables and influences various discursive strategies of identification and persuasion—within which covert and overt racist discourses are embedded—through processes of cybertyping, role-playing, crowdsourcing and (counter-)reaction.

submitted by

#37 Guilty by Visible Association: Socially Mediated Visibility in Gang Prosecutions

Using an affordances framework, we consider how increased visibility afforded by social media impacts the criminal justice process. The use of social media as criminal evidence is a development that particularly impacts low-income populations of color already under heavy surveillance. Content analysis of seven gang indictments filed by the District Attorney (DA) of a large U.S. city that included a total of 1,281 overt acts of conspiracy revealed that social media provided associative evidence that tied defendants to incriminating content and to each other. We find that law enforcement’s access to evidence expands through socially mediated visibility (SMV), and that social media affords prosecutors new tools to define and leverage defendants’ associations as convictable criminal charges. This article explores the possibilities and problems of social media use in gang prosecution.

submitted by

#38 Understanding the Effects of Personalization as a Privacy Calculus: Analyzing Self-Disclosure Across Health, News, and Commerce Contexts

The privacy calculus suggests that online self-disclosure is based on a cost–benefit trade-off. However, although companies progressively collect information to offer tailored services, the effect of both personalization and context-dependency on self-disclosure has remained understudied. Building on the privacy calculus, we hypothesized that benefits, privacy costs, and trust would predict online self-disclosure. Moreover, we analyzed the impact of personalization, investigating whether effects would differ for health, news, and commercial websites. Results from an online experiment using a representative Dutch sample (N = 1,131) supported the privacy calculus, revealing that it was stable across contexts. Personalization decreased trust slightly and benefits marginally. Interestingly, these effects were context-dependent: While personalization affected outcomes in news and commerce contexts, no effects emerged in the health context.

submitted by

#39 How do Online Comments Affect Perceived Descriptive Norms of E-Cigarette Use? The Role of Quasi-Statistical Sense, Valence Perceptions, and Exposure Dosage

By facilitating user participatory features such as online comments, digital media expand the means through which individuals can get access to others’ behavior choices. This opens new research avenues in the pursuit of understanding how social influence operates in the virtual space. The current study examined whether anonymous others’ behavior choices within the online comment board may affect viewers’ descriptive norm perceptions in the real world. Results show that, given sufficient total exposure, viewers’ “quasi-statistical sense” allowed them to correctly identify the numerical majority through subtle individual behavior cues embedded in the online comments, which effectively influenced their estimation of the actual e-cigarette use prevalence among the U.S. population. Perceived behavior choice dominance and valence stance dominance toward e-cigarette use on the online comment board were found to mediate the relationship. Implications for the underlying mechanism of descriptive norm perception formation and future directions are discussed.

submitted by

#40 Platform-swinging in a poly-social-media context: How and why users navigate multiple social media platforms

Guided by the frameworks of niche and polymedia theories, this study sought to understand the phenomenon of platform-swinging on social media, which refers to the routine use of multiple social media platforms that has become commonplace across different ages. Based on focus group discussions (FGDs) with 62 social media users in Singapore, this study found that social media users engage in platform-swinging for relationship management and self-presentation gratifications. While these gratifications are also served by individual social media platforms, platform-swinging allows social media users to navigate structural, social, and norm barriers to obtain greater gratification opportunities. This has implications on how social media users subsequently regard and segment their personal relationships.

submitted by

#41 Effects of the News-Finds-Me Perception in Communication: Social Media Use Implications for News Seeking and Learning About Politics

With social media at the forefront of today's media context, citizens may perceive they don't need to actively seek news because they will be exposed to news and remain well-informed through their peers and social networks. We label this the “news-finds-me perception,” and test its implications for news seeking and political knowledge: “news-finds-me effects.” U.S. panel-survey data show that individuals who perceive news will find them are less likely to use traditional news sources and are less knowledgeable about politics over time. Although the news-finds-me perception is positively associated with news exposure on social media, this behavior doesn't facilitate political learning. These results suggest news continues to enhance political knowledge best when actively sought.

submitted by

#42 Shape and Size Matter for Smartwatches: Effects of Screen Shape, Screen Size, and Presentation Mode in Wearable Communication

This study investigates how variations in the screen shape (round vs. square) and screen size (large vs. small) of smartwatches affect their hedonic and pragmatic qualities and the evaluation of transmitted information. Results from a between-subjects experiment (N = 160) indicate that large screens positively influence information quality by simultaneously increasing both the hedonic and pragmatic qualities of smartwatches. However, the effects of round screens on information quality are mediated only by the hedonic quality, suggesting that square screens are more closely associated with the pragmatic, rather than hedonic, quality of the medium. The results also reveal that the effects of screen shape and screen size are moderated by the presentation mode (text + image vs. text only) of information.

submitted by

#43 Information Overload, Similarity, and Redundancy: Unsubscribing Information Sources on Twitter

The emergence of social media has changed individuals' information consumption patterns. The purpose of this study is to explore the role of information overload, similarity, and redundancy in unsubscribing information sources from users' information repertoires. In doing so, we randomly selected nearly 7,500 ego networks on Twitter and tracked their activities in 2 waves. A multilevel logistic regression model was deployed to test our hypotheses. Results revealed that individuals (egos) obtain information by following a group of stable users (alters). An ego's likelihood of unfollowing alters is negatively associated with their information similarity, but is positively associated with both information overload and redundancy. Furthermore, relational factors can modify the impact of information redundancy on unfollowing.

submitted by

#44 Should I Share That? Prompting Social Norms That Influence Privacy Behaviors on a Social Networking Site

This study examines how explicit and implicit cues to social norms affect disclosure and privacy decisions in a Social Network Site (SNS) context. Study 1 revealed that participants' disclosure behavior adhered to explicit cues indicating disclosure frequency norms, while implicit social norm cues (i.e., surveillance primes) acted to increase overall disclosure frequency and affect disclosure accuracy when explicit cues discourage disclosure. Study 2 explored how these cues affected privacy-setting decisions and found that explicit cues indicating others' privacy settings could increase how strictly participants set their privacy settings, but the implicit cues had no effect. These results suggest that explicit cues about SNS norms can trigger bandwagon heuristic processing, and that, under limited circumstances, surveillance primes can affect self-disclosure.

submitted by

#45 Civic Technology and Community Building: Interaction Effects between Integrated Connectedness to a Storytelling Network (ICSN) and Internet and Mobile Uses on Civic Participation

This study draws on communication infrastructure theory (CIT) to examine the extent to which expressive uses of Internet and mobile devices moderate the relationship between integrated connectedness to a storytelling network (ICSN) and offline and online civic participation. Data collected through a Web survey of a U.S. national online panel (N = 1201) reveal that the relationships of ICSN with offline and online civic participation are conditioned by locality-oriented expressive uses of Internet and mobile media. With these findings, this study discusses theoretical insights, policy implications, and practical applications.

submitted by

#46 Can Interface Cues Nudge Modeling of Food Consumption? Experiments on a Food-Ordering Website

Following the nudging perspective, this research investigates how technology interface could cue heuristics that influence decisions. A field study showed that interface cues on a food-ordering website signaling the amount of food other users consume could trigger an anchoring heuristic and induce individuals to model that amount when deciding their own consumption volume. A laboratory experiment further showed that the anchoring cue tends to induce the modeling behavior of individuals without them being aware of its influence, and such an influence was especially pronounced when resources for cognitive deliberation were limited. Altogether, this research suggests that interface cues could function as nudges and influence decisions at a relatively automatic level. Implications for technology design and intervention are discussed.

submitted by

#47 Object Touch by a Humanoid Robot Avatar Induces Haptic Sensation in the Real Hand

Humanoid robot embodiment is a recently developed form of mediated embodiment. In 2 studies, we report and quantify a new haptic (touch) illusion during embodiment of a humanoid robot. Around 60% of the users in our studies reported haptic sensations in their real hand when they observed their robot avatar touching a curtain with its hand. Critically, our study shows for the first time that users can experience haptic sensations from a nonanthropomorphic embodied limb/agent with visual feedback alone (i.e. no haptic feedback provided). The results have important implications for the understanding of the cognitive processes governing mediated embodiment and the design of avatar scenarios.

submitted by

#48 Structure of Ego-Alter Relationships of Politicians in Twitter

We analyze the ego-alter Twitter networks of 300 Italian MPs and 18 European leaders, and of about 14,000 generic users. We find structural properties typical of social environments, meaning that Twitter activity is controlled by constraints that are similar to those shaping conventional social relationships. However, the evolution of ego-alter ties is very dynamic, which suggests that they are not entirely used for social interaction, but for public signaling and self-promotion. From this standpoint, the behavior of EU leaders is much more evident, while Italian MPs are in between them and generic users. We find that politicians – more than generic users – create relationships as a side effect of tweeting on discussion topics, rather than by contacting specific alters.

submitted by

#49 Is Anybody out There?: Understanding Masspersonal Communication through Expectations for Response across Social Media Platforms

This work extends the masspersonal communication model (MPCM; O'Sullivan & Carr, 2017) by introducing anticipated interaction as a way to understand variations within the masspersonal continuum. Drawing from Thompson's mediated communication framework (1995), we argue that anticipated interaction paves the way for establishing a communicative relationship between interactants. In social media, this relationship is rooted in a sender's expectations for audience response and the imagined responsive audience. Using experience sampling, we show that anticipated interaction varies across social media. Further, we outline the relational and situational factors associated with expecting response and the specificity of imagined responsive audience. These variations and their sources characterize masspersonal communication as a socially and technologically situated practice shaped by multiple intersecting influences.

submitted by

#50 Sexting and Sexual Behavior, 2011–2015: A Critical Review and Meta-Analysis of a Growing Literature

Sexting and its potential links to sexual behavior, including risky sexual practices, have received scholarly scrutiny, but this literature is marked by divergent perspectives and disparate findings. To assess claims regarding the nature of the relationship between sexting and sexual behavior, we conducted a critical review of the literature and analyzed data from 15 articles via quantitative meta-analytic techniques. Sexting behavior was positively related to sexual activity, unprotected sex, and one's number of sexual partners, but the relationship was weak to moderate. Additional information, gleaned from a critical review of included studies, helped contextualize these findings and point to specific limitations and directions for future research.

submitted by

Add your submission

Image Audio Embed

This field is required

Drop Images Here

or

You don't have javascript enabled. Media upload is not possible.

Get image from URL

Maximum upload file size: 50 MB.

Processing...

This field is required

Drop Audio Here

or

You don't have javascript enabled. Media upload is not possible.

e.g.: https://soundcloud.com/community/fellowship-wrapup

Add

Supported services:

Maximum upload file size: 5 MB.

Processing...

This field is required

e.g.: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwoKkq685Hk

Supported services:

Processing...

What do you think?

Written by William Schmitt

ARTICLE LINK – Agonistic Pluralism and Stakeholder Engagement

ARTICLE LINK-Organizational Disruptions and Triggers for Divergent Sensemaking